The Allison Lab

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

University of California, Irvine

3300 Biological Sciences 3

Lab phone: (949) 824-2772

Twitter: @StevenDAllison


Our research explores the functional roles of microbes in ecosystems. Microbes, such as bacteria and fungi, contribute to global carbon balance and cycle nutrients required for plant growth. Using theory, experiments, and mathematical models, we analyze the response of microbial communities to changes in the environment and the consequences for life on Earth. Much of our work focuses on the soil microbiome and feedbacks to global climate change. We also recognize the growing need to manage ecosystems and their microbial inhabitants in the face of human environmental pressures. We aim to provide a sound scientific basis for solving environmental problems, including climate change, at local to global scales. The Allison Lab promotes diversity and inclusivity in all of these efforts.


News:

May 20, 2020

Congratulations to Allison Lab undergraduate Elizabeth Duan who has received the honor of Excellence in Research for her project “Characterizing extracellular microbial activity of tropical deadwood decay in Australia”!

February 27, 2020

Congratulations to Allison Lab undergraduate Brian Chung who has received a Space Grant research scholarship for his work on microbial enzymes in the Earth system!

January 3, 2020

Kelly Ramin’s dissertation work on “Bacterial Tradeoffs in Growth Rate and Extracellular Enzymes” is now published in Frontiers in Microbiology (open access)!

August 8, 2019

Steven Allison and Humanities Dean Tyrus Miller co-authored an article for The Conversation on “Why Science Needs the Humanities to Solve Climate Change”.

Follow-up radio interview on “The Attitude with Arnie Arnesen” is available as a podcast (starting at 35:00). 

June 28, 2019

Congratulations to postdoc Bin Wang for publishing his paper “Emergent properties of organic matter decomposition by soil enzymes” in Soil Biology & Biochemistry. The paper shows a new mathematical approach for scaling up enzyme kinetics that could be used in ecosystem models.

older news

© Steven Allison 2012